A great way to think of a marketing slogan is an offer of a solution to the customer. Taglines that make a specific promise to the public are actually promising a solution to a problem.

An example of such a tagline is the common promise made by liquor stores that: “We have the coldest beer in town.” The problem is that most Americans like to drink cold beer but many liquor stores sell brews that are warm. The store is promising customers that their beer will be cold.

Another promise a liquor store might make is that: “We have the biggest selection of beer in town” or “The largest beer cooler in the Tampa Bay area.” The store owner is promising customers a large selection of beer with the first marketing slogan and stating that a high percentage of his product will be cold with the second tagline.

The Purpose of the Promise

Such marketing slogans have a twofold purpose:

  • To demonstrate a higher level of commitment and dedication to customers. Basically they say “we are willing to go out of our way to meet your needs.” To say to customers “we care about you and want to help you.”

 

  • To set the business apart from the competition. Yes there are liquor stores on every corner in the city but we’re the only store in town with really cold beer and a gigantic selection.

 

A great example of a catchy slogan that would meet these criteria is: “We know beer.” Or “Beer is our passion.” These seemingly simple statements demonstrate passion for the product and a knowledge of it that comes from actually drinking and enjoying beer.

Be Careful What You Promise

You should always be careful what you promise in a  marketing slogan. If you claim to have the coldest beer in town you will have to make a reasonable effort to achieve that goal. Such a tagline is a goal for the business and its employees to achieve as well as a promise.

The liquor store that promises cold beer and a large selection will need to have a cold cooler and a large stock. If it cannot deliver on those promises it’ll disappoint customers and drive them away. The store might not need to measure the temperature constantly but it should definitely count the number of brands of beer offered on its competition’s shelves.

That means vague slogans that promise a commitment to values or a purpose are sometimes better. Promising “We know beer” means a liquor store must hire employees that actually know a lot about beer.

A really great slogan can energize and motivate an organization and its employees even without making such a promise. Pedigree Dog Food likes to boast: “We’re for dogs.” What Pedigree is really saying is that it is passionate about dogs and meeting their needs.

Creating the Slogan Solution

If you want an effective marketing slogan you should think of a solution that your organization offers the public. It could be particular knowledge or expertise that your organization has or just something that you do well. Mainly it should be something that you can easily deliver upon but sets your outfit apart from the competition.

Once you’ve thought of something like that make it the basis of a slogan contest. Such a contest can emphasize your organization’s capabilities and show potential customers the solutions that you can offer.